Sleep And Rest Is Something You Can Do After Season

I really feel like my body is about to lose it, everything hurts and I am just so tired. Keeping my eyes open in class is always the task of the day, I am getting pretty good at sleeping for a few minutes though. The best part is when other people fall a sleep and I can watch the classic jump everybody does when they wake up.  I did it myself ones, I kicked the chair ahead of me so hard that I thought my leg would break. However falling a sleep in class is not something that one should do, might just miss something important. The thing is though, today I realized that my classes this year are super easy. Maybe not grades and that but we never really do anything, in broadcasting we are always going over our work and then we try all the equipment (best way to learn)and use it. English is just chilling in class and write 4 paper during a semester. Theatre, memorize a text and perform it on stage, learn how to breath properly. Communication, watch movies and other people perform their speeches. Anthropology, well 4 exams, but we always discuss in class so it is just interesting. Marquette is pretty awesome!!

Well practise tomorrow at 7, so time to get more then 5 hours a night maybe!

Here is my paper by the way! 17/20

 

Celebrating
Swedish Midsummer

Sebastian
Jansson

Communication
1001, Tom Isaacson, David Kordus

14 September
2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A night filled with dance, food, games,
and great company, is how Swedish people celebrate the day when the sun never
goes down.  Midsummer has been a part of
the Swedish culture since the year 1200, and today it is one of the major holidays
in Sweden (Nordiska). Back in the early days, Swedish people had this feast to
make sure that the harvest of the upcoming fall would be grand, and also to
keep magical creatures away from their homes. Throughout the years the way and
reason to celebrate midsummer has changed, but a lot of things are still the
same. Today the holiday is more about having a big feast with friends, dancing,
and playing games all night long. There is still a lot of tradition that is
essential for celebrating Midsummer the proper way. The Swedes love this holiday
so much that they get together in other countries to celebrate it, for
instance, even here in America. This summer in New York this, a few hundred
people showed up to participate in the celebrations (Swedish Consulate). There
are preparations that have to be made, and certain events that must be
conducted, and a specific ending to the celebrations.

Before the actual celebrations begin, a
lot of preparation is done. The magic is a big part of it; all the young ladies
pick seven or nine different flowers the day before. They put those flowers
under their bed, which should make them dream about their future man. The morning
after they make a crown of flowers out of them to keep the magic in it, to make
sure they meet the man they dreamt about the night before. Therefore, all the
girls wear their flower crowns the whole day. But the most important
preparation is the Midsummer pole, which is a big wooden cross completely
dressed in flowers. We want to have as many different kinds as possible, to
ensure that the harvest is good. As written in a diary from 1875, ‘‘we went out
the night to pick as many different flowers as we possibly could, and we found
23 different kinds” (Sirenius, 1875). In addition to the magic the Midsummer
pole brings, it is the center for all the dances that occur during Midsummer.  In addition to all flowers and the pole,
there are a lot of traditional dishes that are prepared.  Fish, potatoes, special oat meal, special
milk, strawberries, cake, special alcohol, and meatballs, are the essentials on
the dinner table (Olesen, 2006, P. 24).

To make sure that it is a proper Midsummer,
certain events have to be done in a specific order. This starts off in the
morning when a big part of the community comes together and raises the Midsummer
pole, in a big open area to make sure that there is room for dancing, and games
around it (Morrill, 2009, P. 18). When the pole is up, the men set up games
around the area. There are a lot of different games that have been included
throughout the years, but two that have been around the longest is the family
relay race and nail hammering. These events take place at two different times; the
nail hammering competition starts at noon when the music starts playing and
people start getting to the area around the Midsummer pole. The nailing is a
competition to see who is the strongest of all the farmers, and a long time ago
the Swedish population had mostly farmers so the event had a lot prestige.
Nowadays, it is just a continued tradition, but still played in the same manner.
There is a big wooden stump and everyone who wants to compete is given a nail
and a hammer, with that hammer they are suppose to hit the nail all the way in
to the stump with as few blows as possible. The winner receives the hammer as a
proof of his strength and his hammer skills. When the winner has been announced,
the dancing around the Midsummer pole starts. This is the most important event during
the celebration of Midsummer celebration. Circles are created around the pole
and the number of circles depends on the number of people dancing. When the
circles are set up, the music begins, and people are dancing traditional dances
for hours (Nordiska). There are three different songs that are essential for a
correct celebration: dom sma grodorna (the small frogs), prastens korp (the
priests raven), and sa gora (as do).  When the big dance is over, people go back to
their own house with closer friends and family. There the big relay race is
held, usually family against family, three events with four participants. The first
event in the relay is to carry an egg in a spoon 15 yards forward and back, and
then the next person goes the same distance but in a sack. The last event in
the relay is a three legged race, 15 yards forward and then back again. It is
tradition that the family that wins gets to take the first piece of the cake.

When Midsummer is celebrated, there is a
specific way to end things to ensure a proper harvest, and having a great time.
The dancing and celebrating goes on all night, and when the sun raises in the
morning the tradition of the Swedish people to dance a final dance. Everybody
gets together at their specific house and dances around a small midsummer pole,
and when the dance is over we sit down at a table and sing a traditional
Swedish drinking song. All the adults take a shot of classical Swedish liquor,
and the children get juice. When this is done, the Midsummer celebrations sadly
are over.

In accordance with celebrating the Swedish
Midsummer in a correct manner there must be certain preparations made: picking
flowers to ensure you meet your true love, preparing the Midsummer pole so all
the dancing will be possible. Also, the food needs to be prepared, so that it
will be ready for eating the day of Midsummer. During the actual Midsummer, the
most important aspect is to have fun, but to celebrate it properly. This always
leads to a lot of laughter and fun for all involved, and someone will get a new
hammer. At the end of the night when the sun rises, you do a final dance, and
take a final drink and sing a final song. When all this is done, the harvest
for the fall is ensured to be good. Today, however, we know that things like
that do not help the harvest, but we still keep our tradition and culture
throughout this celebration. Midsummer is also a great time to get together and
just enjoy life, which a lot of people like. The fact that Swedish people get
together in foreign countries to celebrate Midsummer is a clear sign of how
much it is enjoyed.

 

 

  References

Sirenius, E.
(1975). Fourdiaries. Botkyrka: Sodermanlands Museum.Retrieved from http://www.sormlandsmuseum.se/Sormlandsmuseum/Samlingar/dagens-historia/Juni/Midsommar—24-juni/

Nordiska , (n.d.). Midsommar. Retrieved
from http://www.nordiskamuseet.se/publication.asp?publicationid=2346

Swedish
Consulate, (n.d.). Swedish midsummer festival in battery park. Retrieved
from http://www.swedenabroad.com/Page____13256.aspx

Morrill, A.
M. (2009). Thanksgiving and other harvest festivals. Chelsea House Publications.

Olesen, E.
O. (2006). Adventure guide to Sweden. Hunter Publishing, Inc.

///Sebastian

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Sleep And Rest Is Something You Can Do After Season

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s